Category Archives: Produce Availability

What’s in the box?

This week we have a nice variety of spring vegetables for you to enjoy. The students and volunteers at the student farm have spent the last week harvesting the fixing for a great salad and some greens that are not only good but good for you.

Your salad will consist of fresh salad mix, arugula, pea shoots and even some carrots and radishes. The greens we will be providing for you are collards, dino kale, swiss chard, vitamin greens, spinach, and baby pac choi. We also included some sweet potatoes and popcorn for you to enjoy.

A lot of southerners know what collards and kale are but are not as familiar with swiss chard. One of the reasons for this is that is used to be a vegetable grown mostly in the north. Most southerners probably don’t know how to prepare it; I have a solution for that. I am including some basic instructions on how I prep it for cooking and a recipe for you to try.

Until I can prepare it, I keep it cool in my fridge, but you don’t want to keep it too long or it will start to lose some of its nutrients and quality.

This leafy green was identified by a Swiss botanist and is a variety of Beta vulgaris. Today, Swiss chard is most popular in Mediterranean countries. Swiss chard is a nutritional powerhouse — an excellent source of vitamins K, A, and C, as well as a good source of magnesiumpotassium, iron, and dietary fiber. One cup of chopped Swiss chard has just 35 calories and provides more than 300% of the daily value for vitamin K. But skip this veggie if you’re prone to kidney stones; it contains oxalates, which decrease the body’s absorption of calcium and can lead to kidney stones.

Prepare Swiss chard by rinsing the crisp leaves several times in warm water. Leaves and stalks can be boiled, steamed, or roasted. Here are a couple of recipes you can try.

Swiss Chard Potato Frittata: Ingredients- Makes 4 servings

Cooking spray

1 1/2 cups diced potatoes (about 1/2 pound or use frozen hash browns)

1 large onion, chopped

4 cups (about 6 ounces) coarsely chopped Swiss chard (stems and center ribs removed)

4 large eggs

4 large egg whites

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp pepper

1/2 cup shredded low-fat cheese


1. Heat an 8- to 10-inch ovenproof skillet coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat. Preheat broiler.

2. Sauté onions until browned, about 8 to 10 minutes; set aside. In the same skillet, sauté potatoes until golden brown, about 8 to 10 minutes; set aside. Add Swiss chard to skillet over medium heat, and cook about 6 to 8 minutes. Add cooking spray as needed.

3. In a medium bowl whisk eggs, egg whites, salt, and pepper until frothy. Mix in onions, potatoes, and Swiss chard.

4. Heat skillet with cooking spray over medium-high heat and pour egg mixture into pan. Cook covered 3 to 5 minutes or until set.

5. Spread cheese on the frittata. Broil 3 to 5 minutes until browned.

Per serving: 218 calories, 17 g protein, 20 g carbohydrate, 9 g fat (4 g saturated fat), 221 mg cholesterol, 2 g fiber, 3 g sugar, 445 mg sodium. Calories from fat: 36%.

My simple recipe:


2 lbs. Swiss chard

1/2 lb. Bacon with grease

salt and pepper

Fry the bacon and reserve for later. Chop the swiss chard and add to the grease in the pan and cook until wilted down completely. Crumble the bacon on top, salt and pepper to taste and enjoy.

My husband loves it this way. Hope you enjoy your veggies this week and hope you try the recipes.

P.S Would love to have shown you some beautiful pictures of your veggies, but my computer wouldn’t cooperate, lol.

Posted by Sherry Carroll


11/30/17 What’s in the CSA box this week?

There are some unique veggies in the box this week. The fall harvest is still going on the farm and we have got some treats for you. There are two kinds of head lettuce, Picat Butterhead, and Cimmaron Romaine. There is also some Ginger, cilantro, and turmeric.

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The other veggies in the box are:

  • Ginger
  • Leeks
  • Garlic
  • Purple top white turnips
  • Watermelon radish
  • Kohlrabi
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Kale
  • Carrots
  • Beets
  • Fennel
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Chervil
  • Collards

Here are a few things you need to know about kohlrabi:

  1. When raw, it tastes like a slightly spicier version of broccoli stems, like a mix of broccoli stem and radish. When cooked, it’s a bit sweeter, especially if caramelized. You can cut it into cubes or wedges and roast it, or slice or cut into matchsticks and stir-fry.
  2. The leaves are edible (and loaded with iron); add them to a salad or saute with garlic as you would mustard or beet greens.
  3. Kohlrabi is a good source of fiber, vitamins C and B6, and potassium.

There is more information on this veggie at :

You also need to know about the turmeric in the box so here are a few hints on how to use it:

  1. Use Fresh Turmeric to Add a Health Kick to Smoothies. …
  2. 2. Make Indian Golden Milk (Haldi Ka Doodh) …
  3. Use it as a Substitute for Mustard or Saffron. …
  4. Turn White Rice into Golden Rice. …
  5. Dehydrate Leftover Turmeric Root. …
  6. 6. Make a Turmeric Omelette. …
  7. Substitute Fresh for Dried Turmeric in Curry Paste Recipes.

Now I have a couple of recipes for you to check out. Here are the links and I hope you enjoy them.

Roasted root vegetables with fennel, garlic & thyme


posted by Sherry Carroll



Whats going on down on the farm?

CSA boxes are packed on Wed. Mornings,  but not this week due to theThanksgiving Holiday. Big boxes were packed last week to hold members through.

Lately,  we’ve been focusing on getting ready for winter.  We harvested the last of the crops in summer blocks, (including sweet potatoes), built beds to be ready for spring,  and sow cover crops. More and more Fall crops have been maturing, as well as those in our late summer high tunnel,  so there is more diversity of produce available.
We also got the North and Eastern sides of the pack shed mulched-and have inoculated the wood chips with Wine cap mushroom spawn.
 We are getting in a new Delaware rooster this week as well,  and have found a good home for “Ranger”, who has been doing a very good job of taking care of the flock in the meantime.
From this point on, we will have plenty of harvests left to do,  but most of the other time sensitive duties are winding down quickly.
Sherry Carroll

CSA for 11/15/17

csa box.jpg

This week in your CSA box you will find a few new items! These include chicory root, turmeric, kohlrabi, carrots, and 2 varieties of sweet potatoes. Please note that there will not be a CSA box next week due to Thanksgiving break.

Chicory root is a source of prebiotic fiber that assists the good bacteria in your gut, boosting your immune function. The root can be consumed raw or cooked, prepared similarly to dandelion root. Can also be dried, ground, and used as a coffee substitute. Additional resource:

Turmeric is part of the ginger family. It has digestive, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant benefits. Some common ways to use turmeric is to grate it in to smoothies, soups, curries, and rice dishes. It can even be used as a toothpaste! Note that the golden (orange) varieties of turmeric may stain skin. Additional resource:

Kohlrabi is a member of the Brassica family and is similar in taste and texture to a broccoli stem– though has a bit more crunch. My favorite simple preparation is to slice as thin “steaks” and roast in oven or grill. It can also be eaten raw as a slaw (but make sure to slice very thin and marinate to soften).


To extend the life of your carrots, top immediately before storing in fridge. Tops will continue to transpire, which will cause the roots to wilt. Carrot top pesto is a farm favorite, and easy to prepare– all you need is olive oil, garlic, salt, walnuts, and tops. Blend and enjoy with your next grilled cheese!

The smaller varieties of sweet potatoes in the CSA box this week are best eaten sooner rather than later, cooked while the skin is still thin. When aged, the skin becomes more tough and may be more challenging to peel and remove.


Thanks for your continued support, and enjoy the bounty!



Out With Summer Favorites, In With Fall Seedlings

This week, enjoy some of the season’s last week of summer favorites as we move towards planning and planting fall crops.



Here is what you will find in your CSA box this week:


Assorted eggplant

Sweet peppers



Sweet potato greens

Holy basil


Pinto Gold potatoes

Red Ichilleum garlic

Gladstone onions

Please note that red shishito peppers can take on a spicy, hot taste unlike the green version of the pepper.



The Gladstone onions should also be consumed soon to preserve desired freshness.


Boxes are ready for pickup

We begin the 3rd season with remnants of summer, place holding for the anticipated Fall Brassica bunches. The boxes include 14 items, all for your enjoyment and well being.

Please note: Yellow Cipollini (Chip-oh-lee-nee), meaning “little onions” are not great storage onions and will not keep for long. Johnny’s Selected Seeds recommends roasting these tiny treasures whole, in butter or oil.

Here is a list of the CSA produce:


Holy Basil




German Stiffneck Garlic

Hungarian wax peppers



Parsley (flat leaf or curly)

Potatoes (huckleberry)

Red chilies

Sweet peppers

Yellow Cipollini Onions

Our last summer CSA…

This week will be the final summer CSA. The fall CSA will begin again after a 3-week hiatus. Thank you for all of your support during our summer  growing season!

This week you will find the following items in the CSA box:

Sweet potato greens

Early jalapeños

Red chiles

Banana peppers

Hungarian wax peppers




Mixed new potatoes

Sweet peppers



Talon onions

German Stiffneck Garlic