Category Archives: Recipes

11/30/17 What’s in the CSA box this week?

There are some unique veggies in the box this week. The fall harvest is still going on the farm and we have got some treats for you. There are two kinds of head lettuce, Picat Butterhead, and Cimmaron Romaine. There is also some Ginger, cilantro, and turmeric.

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The other veggies in the box are:

  • Ginger
  • Leeks
  • Garlic
  • Purple top white turnips
  • Watermelon radish
  • Kohlrabi
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Kale
  • Carrots
  • Beets
  • Fennel
  • Brussel Sprouts
  • Chervil
  • Collards

Here are a few things you need to know about kohlrabi:

  1. When raw, it tastes like a slightly spicier version of broccoli stems, like a mix of broccoli stem and radish. When cooked, it’s a bit sweeter, especially if caramelized. You can cut it into cubes or wedges and roast it, or slice or cut into matchsticks and stir-fry.
  2. The leaves are edible (and loaded with iron); add them to a salad or saute with garlic as you would mustard or beet greens.
  3. Kohlrabi is a good source of fiber, vitamins C and B6, and potassium.

There is more information on this veggie at :

http://www.health.com/food/what-is-kohlrabi

You also need to know about the turmeric in the box so here are a few hints on how to use it:

  1. Use Fresh Turmeric to Add a Health Kick to Smoothies. …
  2. 2. Make Indian Golden Milk (Haldi Ka Doodh) …
  3. Use it as a Substitute for Mustard or Saffron. …
  4. Turn White Rice into Golden Rice. …
  5. Dehydrate Leftover Turmeric Root. …
  6. 6. Make a Turmeric Omelette. …
  7. Substitute Fresh for Dried Turmeric in Curry Paste Recipes.

Now I have a couple of recipes for you to check out. Here are the links and I hope you enjoy them.

Roasted root vegetables with fennel, garlic & thyme

ENJOY!!!

posted by Sherry Carroll

 

 

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CSA for 11/15/17

csa box.jpg

This week in your CSA box you will find a few new items! These include chicory root, turmeric, kohlrabi, carrots, and 2 varieties of sweet potatoes. Please note that there will not be a CSA box next week due to Thanksgiving break.

Chicory root is a source of prebiotic fiber that assists the good bacteria in your gut, boosting your immune function. The root can be consumed raw or cooked, prepared similarly to dandelion root. Can also be dried, ground, and used as a coffee substitute. Additional resource: https://www.livestrong.com/article/371906-medicinal-uses-of-chicory-root/

Turmeric is part of the ginger family. It has digestive, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant benefits. Some common ways to use turmeric is to grate it in to smoothies, soups, curries, and rice dishes. It can even be used as a toothpaste! Note that the golden (orange) varieties of turmeric may stain skin. Additional resource: https://www.livestrong.com/article/135303-the-benefits-raw-turmeric/

Kohlrabi is a member of the Brassica family and is similar in taste and texture to a broccoli stem– though has a bit more crunch. My favorite simple preparation is to slice as thin “steaks” and roast in oven or grill. It can also be eaten raw as a slaw (but make sure to slice very thin and marinate to soften).

carrot

To extend the life of your carrots, top immediately before storing in fridge. Tops will continue to transpire, which will cause the roots to wilt. Carrot top pesto is a farm favorite, and easy to prepare– all you need is olive oil, garlic, salt, walnuts, and tops. Blend and enjoy with your next grilled cheese!

The smaller varieties of sweet potatoes in the CSA box this week are best eaten sooner rather than later, cooked while the skin is still thin. When aged, the skin becomes more tough and may be more challenging to peel and remove.

leeks

Thanks for your continued support, and enjoy the bounty!

–CSA FARM TEAM

 

10/11 What’s in this Week’s CSA Box?

There are a couple of new items in this weeks CSA! You will see a mix of mustards, arugula, and asian greens (to be enjoyed as a micro-green salad), as well as a daikon radish included your share this week.

(Pictured left: harvested Asian Greens, known as Te You, Mebuna, and Hon Tsa Tai. Pictured right: Farmhand Ashley unearthing the first Daikon Radish of the season. Could be a State Fair Winner!) 

The Daikon radish is also known as the ‘Chinese Turnip’ or ‘Japenese Horseradish’, but despite this last moniker, this radish tends to have less of a ‘bite’ than the more familiar pink Cherry Belle. It is crisp and juicy in texture, and can be used either raw or cooked. See below the CSA pack list for a ideas on how to prepare this giant-ly healthful root crop!

This week’s CSA box also includes:

  • Shishito Peppers
  • Garlic
  • Eggplant
  • Potatoes
  • Sweet Potato Greens
  • Jalapenos
  • Sweet Peppers
  • Daikon Radish
  • Microgreens (Mix of Arugula, Garnet Mustard Greens, + Asian Greens)
  • Beet Greens

Daikon Recipe Ideas

  • Radish-Slaw (with carrots, apples, fennel, whatever you want to use! finish with vinaigrette)
  • Glazed with greens (butter and water and cubed pieces in pan, 2-3 TB sugar, cook until water evaporates+add greens, yum!)
  • Add to Stir-fry!
  • Quick Pickle ’em and keep them in your fridge!
  • Make Daikon Chips via the broiler! Add olive oil, salt, pepper, and whatever seasoning you’d like– garlic powder, paprika, etc)

For the serious home-chef I’ve included here is a youtube video about how to prepare a vegan version of Lo Bak Go. Ingredients needed are your daikon radish, rice flour, dried shiitake, scallions, shallots, garlic, salt, pepper, and frying oil.

 

Happy eating!

Post written by Laura Maule

What came first, the popcorn or the grit?

Long before the New World was ‘discovered’, corn was known to many civilizations as maize. The Zuni Indians of New Mexico called it tawa. When translated, tawa means ‘old’. The term accurately expresses how old this cereal grain is, OLD! Throughout history corn was made into cakes, porridge and even beer. The Iroquois are given credit for popcorn, maize was mixed in receptacles that held hot sand and cooked slowly until the kernels burst. Thanks to the tenacity of our ancestors we are able to craft many of the corn dishes we love today.

And even still we are finding new ways to elevate corn in the kitchen. Creating grits from popcorn is not entirely a new concept. Many chefs have recreated popcorn grits. But I thought it creatively simple enough to share.

What type of popping corn can you use?

Any popping corn will do. This recipe will use the Dakota Black and Tom Thumb to highlight the varieties included in the CSA box. If you’re interested, the seeds for both varieties are available through High Mowing Seeds. I initially thought that the purple black seeds of the Dakota Black would impart their deep hue to the grits. Not quite, the color transfers only slightly. But there are interesting bits of purple shell visible throughout the finished product.

Why take perfectly good popping corn and make grits?

The corn flavor is intensified with the corn broth, created by boiling the popped kernels in water with butter. This dish is excellent because it avoids a major pitfall,  getting popcorn stuck in your teeth.

Final notes

The recipe does not yield a large amount of grits compared to the amount of popcorn used. A corn sheller would make removing the kernels easier but it’s possible to remove them by hand. When popping the corn, avoid the temptation to use high heat. The burnt popcorn taste will transfer to the finished bowl of grits. Low and slow is the best way to go.

Here is a link to a recipe with easy to follow instructions.

popcorn grits

Two book sources used for this article are:

A History of Food by Maguelonne Toussaint-Samat

The Flavor Bible by Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg

 

Post by Shaquannah Faison

Fresh and Flavorful Salsa

Makes about 3 cups

2 cups red and green tomatoes, chopped

2/3 c onions, chopped

1/4 c shishitos, diced

½ c red and green peppers, chopped

1/3 c parsley, finely chopped

1 jalapeño, minced

1 1/2 T lime juice

Salt to taste

Combine All ingredients in bowl and mix well. Make a day ahead to let flavors meld. Enjoy

Salsa Fresh JulyPost by: Shaquannah Faison

What I did with my bulb fennel

Bulb fennel is not the most common of vegetables, and with its slightly sweet, anise like flavor, many are puzzled about how to use it. I like to use it as an ingredient in a slaw. Traditionally slaw is cabbage based and mine is as well. I used about two-thirds finely sliced red cabbage and one-third finely sliced bulb fennel for this recipe. One half of a medium-sized sweet onion and some finely diced fennel leaves were the additional vegetable ingredients. I made a lemon juice and olive oil dressing, added salt and pepper to taste and then added some crumbled blue cheese and toasted walnuts when ready to serve.