What’s Happening on the Farm

It seems this winter has been very warm.  So warm, in fact, that I have been a little skeptical whether or not everyone’s fruit trees will set fruit , or if my broccoli will button from a late freeze.  So warm, in fact, that I decided to try a little early outdoor planting of some heartier spring crops like spinach and snap peas to get a head start on the year in my own garden.  More on that later.

The Student Farm at CCCC is currently less busy on harvesting, as there isn’t a whole lot to harvest this time of year, and more busy preparing for spring planting.

20170208_120227

Hoop House A is bustin’ with greens! Spinach, Collards, and Swiss Chard make a delicious braising combo.

Hoop House A is busting with greens, and the kale is starting to bolt from the heat, believe it or not!  That’s okay, kale flowers are one of my favorite snacks.  You really should try some this year if you never have.  They also attract beneficial insects like pollinators and predatory wasps that kill those nasty aphids.

20170208_120509

Beautiful, colorful salad mix in Hoop House South

Hoop House South is growing some beautiful salad mix coming up that is almost ready to harvest.

20170208_120347

Peas trellised and planted; irrigation installed

In Block One, where the winter brassica crops (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, etc.) were planted, are now prepared, bare beds full of potential, and in one of those beds we have peas planted and trellised.  Down on Block 7 the students have been diligent preparing the potato beds.

In the propagation greenhouse, the new brassica transplants for the big spring planting are not quite ready to set out just yet, and need a couple weeks longer.  They are currently spending some of the day outside in the cold frame on warm days to get them hardened off.

20170206_101534

Advanced Crop Production Teacher Cheryl McNeil instructing on the finer techniques of using bed-building hoes

 

20170206_095634

Baby broccoli in the Propagation Greenhouse

There are plans in the works for some new polycarbonate sheeting on the propagation greenhouse to replace the dull sheets that were installed 18 years ago.  Along with fresh plastic will be a few other innovations to improve ventilation, to be announced in a future entry.

Like I stated before, and as you’ve probably noticed, it’s been unseasonably warm this winter.  It doesn’t look like we’ll really get a winter, since Sir Walter Wally saw his shadow. In my own garden in Hillsborough, I decided to bet against the cold ahead of Ol’ Wally and plant a 30-foot row of peas as well as some spinach in mid January.  I know, you probably think I’m crazy.  Don’t worry, I think so, too.  And sometimes, crazy can pay off.  Sometimes, taking a risk can lead to big rewards.  And for me, at least this time, it looks like I might come out on top.  Not trying to, “count my chickens,” but I’ve already got sugar snap peas peaking 2″-3″ out of the ground, and my spinach is over an inch tall, with some true leaves.   I’ve only covered them one night in the three weeks they’ve been in the ground.  Is there really something to this climate change thing, or is it just freak weather?   I’m thinking the former.

20170208_170825

Spinach seedlings in my garden right now, planted mid January

20170208_170850

Sugar snaps already 3 inches tall

 

For further reading on climate change, check out what NASA has to say about it, if you believe them:

http://climate.nasa.gov/evidence/ 

-Josh Calhoun, Advanced Crop Production Class

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s