CCCC FARM BLOG

03/15/2013

Hello CCCC Farm Bloggers,

Is it just me or are most people wishing Spring would just hurry up and get here.  I know the same thing happens every year, we get a little taste of the good stuff and then it turns cold again.  I’m sure it’s on the way; I should just learn to be patient.

All the temperature fluctuations got me thinking about how the honeybees are handling it.  The honeybees, Alpis mellifera, have been laid up in their hive all winter.  To make it, they huddle in a cluster, trying to stay warm enough.  For energy they consume the honey they storied when the nectar was flowing.  A bees whole agenda is to reproduce and survive the winter.  The bees must be thinking its warm out, no its not.

The beehives used today were patented in 1852, by a Congregational minister from Ohio, named Lorenzo Langstroth.  He must have done an amazing job from the beginning because it’s the same style used today.  The different sizes of hives are mainly for the comfort, strength more like it, of the beekeeper and size of the hive. One of the hive sections filled with honey can weigh close to 100 pounds.

They are very aware of their surroundings and how things are going. Bees don’t like to be cramped or hungry.  If things aren’t right they will be looking for new digs.

A lot of the communication amongst the bees is performed through the release of pheromones within the colony.  When bees feel threaten and sting someone the smell of the pheromone it excretes resembles that of a bananas scent.  All the banana lovers out there might should think about laying off them before poking around in a bee hive.  If not, you might get lit up.  Also, if stung, stay calm, right, will do.

I’m just beginning to learn about these amazing creatures.   I do know we need to do our part to keep them happy and around.  NC Cooperative Extension website, under growing small farms, has lots of information concerning flowers bees love.  Most local counties have associations that provide all the information to get started.  Remember, no bees, no fruit…

 

Image

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s